Author Archives: nealclinic

Good and bad decisions

Rhetorical question: How do we learn to make good decisions in our lives?

Answer:  By making bad decisions and learning a lesson.  

 I am treating a patient who had an automobile accident. Not a bad one, but he could tell something was different. The patient came in to have me check it out. We have worked on him five or six times. He’s doing much, much better – 95 to 98% improvement, so we’re almost done.

The better story here….

He went to see his family MD for another concern. During his visit, he was telling the nurse that he had been in to see us for his injury.  She said, “that was the right thing to do.” She continued to tell him that she had an accident 10 years ago, and she was never treated because the symptoms weren’t severe. Now she has a stiff neck every single day.  She regrets not seeing a chiropractor after her accident.

So…Nurse Elaine.

If you are reading this, I recommend that you get in here as soon as possible. I can still do some good work for you even though your injury was 10 years ago.  Thank you for encouraging my patient by letting him know that he made a good choice to get treatment after his accident.

I treat a lot of nurses. They see me, or sometimes, they experience all the consequences of not getting an injury properly treated, even if it is a minor injury.

If you have upset the alignment and movement patterns of a joint in your body, it will cause you problems in the future. There are very few certainties in the world of healthcare, but I can promise you a misaligned joint with an abnormal pattern of movement is going to breakdown, degenerate, and eventually, cause trouble.

Get it fixed ASAP.  It’s better for you, and it makes my job easier.

If you need to heal, see Dr. Neal!

What’s the best drug for a pinched nerve?

drugsIf you have a pinched nerve, I have some bad news for you.  Your body protects your brain and nervous system from anything in your blood stream.  That’s vitally important because when you have an infection, it will often get into your blood stream.  If an infection is able to get into your brain or your nerves there is now a much bigger problem (like seizures or death).

This blood-brain barrier between your blood stream and your nervous system is a good design except for one problem. When you take a drug by mouth, it can never get to your nerves because of your blood-brain barrier.  So, what’s the best drug to take for a pinched nerve? None – the meds can’t get to your nerves.

In the medical world, they will often prescribe opiates or anti-depressants for a pinched nerve.  With the opiates, you just don’t care how much it hurts.  With the anti-depressants, they are trying to redirect the pain signals from your nerves to a different area of your brain, so you don’t have as much perception of pain.

Does that work?  Sometimes.

Is that a long term solution to a pinched nerve?  No.

If there is a structural problem that is irritating a nerve, you need a structural solution.  That sounds simple and obvious – except that the medical world didn’t get it yet. Unless you count physical therapy or injecting steroids into your spinal canal.  The neurosurgeon will tell you to try conservative care first and surgery is last resort.

Chiropractic is a good structural solution for many pinched nerves.  It is the ONLY effective solution for some.

Are you one of those?

If you need to heal, see Dr. Neal!

I don’t care how bad it hurts

Okay, maybe I do, but the take away here is that the level of pain you’re having isn’t always the important factor. Bad pain doesn’t necessarily mean a surgical level problem. Nerve irritation is why you feel pain, but that’s also true with numbness (a lack of sensation). Whether it hurts a lot or just a little, the amount of pain you’re feeling is not the determinant of what treatment you need.

I have seen patients crying in pain, carried into my clinic by two friends, yet they have a simple and easy-to-fix problem. Then, I have seen patients who have minimal pain in an emergency surgery case.

The key is to discover the cause of your nerve irritation. Once you know what’s irritating your nerves, the answer to your best treatment plan is easier.

Keep in mind that the medical world is generally not fond of patients with a pinched nerve because there really aren’t any medications to treat them. (I’ll address that specifically in my next blog discussion). Talk to a doctor who has non-drug treatment options at their disposal.

A great first opinion would be a chiropractor who uses rehab, chiropractic, physical therapy, Class IV laser therapy, and deep tissue therapeutic massage. If it appears to be medical or surgical level problem, your chiropractor should recognize that and send you to the right doctor or surgeon.

If you need to heal, see Dr Neal.